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Beaver Convicted of Tax Evasion

Author: |April 5, 2013

Beaver Convicted of Tax Evasion

Cook County Commissioner William Beavers was found guilty of tax law violations, being convicted of tax evasion in a federal courtroom in Chicago.

Beavers was found guilty of one count of attempting to hide money from the Internal Revenue Service and three counts of filing false tax returns in 2006, 2007 and 2008. Recent testimony from an IRS agent may have been the turning point in the trial, particularly after the agent revealed evidence showing that Beavers had used thousands of dollars in campaign funds to gamble at neighborhood casinos. Evidence revealed him cashing checks ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 in the days prior to and days of visiting casinos.

Despite the ruling, Beavers maintained his innocence, and said he was convicted for failing to wear a wire for federal investigators, according to the Chicago Tribune.

“There’s no law against what I did,” said Beavers, according to the Tribune. “There’s no law against gambling with campaign funds.”

Beavers had always asserted that the money he took from campaign coffers was intended to be a loan. However, prosecutors were able to present evidence that discredited the commissioners claims that he planned to repay the money.

Beaver Convicted of Tax Evasion

Author:

Cook County Commissioner William Beavers was found guilty of tax law violations, being convicted of tax evasion in a federal courtroom in Chicago.

Beavers was found guilty of one count of attempting to hide money from the Internal Revenue Service and three counts of filing false tax returns in 2006, 2007 and 2008. Recent testimony from an IRS agent may have been the turning point in the trial, particularly after the agent revealed evidence showing that Beavers had used thousands of dollars in campaign funds to gamble at neighborhood casinos. Evidence revealed him cashing checks ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 in the days prior to and days of visiting casinos.

Despite the ruling, Beavers maintained his innocence, and said he was convicted for failing to wear a wire for federal investigators, according to the Chicago Tribune.

“There’s no law against what I did,” said Beavers, according to the Tribune. “There’s no law against gambling with campaign funds.”

Beavers had always asserted that the money he took from campaign coffers was intended to be a loan. However, prosecutors were able to present evidence that discredited the commissioners claims that he planned to repay the money.

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